Remote Bible study

Due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, we will be conducting Bible study remotely via Zoom teleconferencing.  Zoom allows our pastor to conduct the study from his computer and allows participants to see, hear, speak, participate in breakout groups, ask questions, and even remotely raise their hands!


Our remote Bible studies continue at the same time, 9:30 am on Sundays. 

Here's how it will work:


First, Zoom provides a how-to video that walks you through the step-by-step process of what you will need to join.


Second, members of Redeemer will receive an email link toward the end of the week that they can click on to join the Bible study.  If you are not receiving that email and would like to participate, please email us and we can add you to our list.


Finally, materials and handouts will be posted below for each session.  Please download them in advance of each session.

    april 5: Luther & the plague epidemic

    We will discuss Martin Luther's counsel in his 1527 letter "Whether One May Flee from a Deadly Plague" in light of our current situation.  

    If possible, participants are encouraged to read the letter in its entirety either before or after our session.  You can find that here.


    After reading selections of Luther's writing, this session's objective is to develop guidance on a proper Christian way to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.


    Download the study guide here: Luther_the_Plague.pdf

    april 19: from spark to firestorm - reformation events after 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at the Heidelberg Disputation (1518), especially how the theology of the cross impacts our life today.


    This session's objective is to apply the theology of the cross to a person who wonders where God is during the COVID-19 crisis. 


    Download the study guide here: L1_Heidelberg_Disputation.pdf

    APRIL 26: FROM SPARK TO FIRESTORM - REFORMATION EVENTS AFTER 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at the Leipzig Debate (1519), especially the role of authority in the church today.


    This session's objective is to craft a response to the perennial question, "With so many churches, interpretations, and religious authorities out there, how do you know you're right?"


    Download the study guide here: L2_Leipzig_Debate.pdf

    May 3: FROM SPARK TO FIRESTORM - REFORMATION EVENTS AFTER 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at the three influential manifestos, or treatises: To the German Nobility, On the Babylonian Captivity, and On the Freedom of the Christian (1520).


    This session's objective is to develop some principles, based on Luther's writings, that Christians can use to guide their congregations through ministry changes.


    Download the study guide here: L3_Manifestos.pdf

    MAY 10: FROM SPARK TO FIRESTORM - REFORMATION EVENTS AFTER 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at Luther's stand before Emperor Charles V at the Diet of Wörms (1521).


    This session's objective is to craft a statement if one was ever threatened to retract their faith.


    Download the study guide here: L4_Diet_of_Wo_rms.pdf

    MAY 24: FROM SPARK TO FIRESTORM - REFORMATION EVENTS AFTER 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at Luther's stay at the Wartburg Castle, where he translated the New Testament into German (1521-1522).


    This session's objective is to personally consider whether we take for granted how available the Bible is in the English language.


    Download the study guide here: L5_Wartburg.pdf

    MAY 31: FROM SPARK TO FIRESTORM - REFORMATION EVENTS AFTER 1517

    The Reformation did not stop after Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on October 31, 1517.  Five hundred years later, we commemorate the anniversary of the events that took place after 1517.  Today we look at Luther's return from the Wartburg Castle and his Eight Sermons at Wittenberg that quelled the unrest and riots that were taking place during his absence (1522).


    This session's objective is to plan how we, in light of what we learned, can guide a congregation through potential polarization as we reopen in-person worship.


    Download the study guide here: L6_Preaching_at_Wittenberg.pdf